Civil Procedure

  • Brooks Range Petroleum Corp. v. Shearer In Brooks Range Petroleum Corp. v. Shearer, the supreme court held that the proper venue for tort claims is where the harmful force of the tort first took effect, and that proper venue for contract claims is where a substantial part of the events giving rise to the claim occurred. While weighing a full-time employment ...
  • Gross v. Wilson In Gross v. Wilson, the Supreme Court of Alaska held that a properly challenged erroneous judgment is not void unless the deciding court lacked subject matter jurisdiction or violated due process.  In the final divorce agreement between Robert Gross and Dawn Wilson, Gross agreed to regularly pay Wilson half of the value of his monthly ...
  • Fink v. Anchorage In Fink v. Anchorage, the Supreme Court of Alaska held that in directly reviewing a municipal assembly’s decision to levy a special assessment, a court will defer to the Assembly’s expertise and only reverse upon proof of fraud or arbitrariness.  Decades after an earthquake destroyed the neighborhood of Turnagain Heights, lot owners petitioned the Municipality ...
  • Miller v. Fowler In Miller v. Fowler, the Supreme Court of Alaska held that summary judgment will rarely be proper when the discovery rule is used to determine the accrual date of a statute of limitations as determining that date is a fact intensive analysis.  In September 2009, Miller purchased an apartment building from Fowler with a promissory ...
  • Toni 1 Trust, by Tangwall v. Wacker In Toni 1 Trust, by Tangwall v. Wacker, the supreme court held that section 34.40.110(k) of the Alaska Statutes cannot deprive either federal or other states’ courts of jurisdiction over fraudulent transfer actions. In 2007, a Montana court issued multiple default judgments against Tangwall and his family, leading them to transfer property to a trust ...
  • Mattox v. State In Mattox v. State,  Prior to the altercation, ...
  • State v. Seigle In State v. Seigle, Seigle was convicted ...
  • Reasner v. State In Reasner v. State, the supreme court held that the lower court erred in granting a motion for summary judgment on the grounds that the statute of limitations had tolled, because there was a material question of fact regarding when the alleged victim acquired the necessary information to alert her of a potential cause of ...
  • Johnson v. Johnson In Johnson v. Johnson,  At the conclusion of her divorce proceedings, Cynthia Johnson physically attacked her husband’s attorney as ...
  • Todeschi v. Sumitomo Metal Mining Pogo, LLC In Todeschi v. Sumitomo Metal Mining Pogo, LLC, the supreme court held the superior court’s refusal to provide an adverse inference jury instruction for an employee, based on the employer’s failure to produce certain evidence during discovery, was harmless because the employee was permitted to argue in closing arguments that the jury could make adverse ...

Civil Procedure

  • Brooks Range Petroleum Corp. v. Shearer In Brooks Range Petroleum Corp. v. Shearer, the supreme court held that the proper venue for tort claims is where the harmful force of the tort first took effect, and that proper venue for contract claims is where a substantial part of the events giving rise to the claim occurred. While weighing a full-time employment ...
  • Gross v. Wilson In Gross v. Wilson, the Supreme Court of Alaska held that a properly challenged erroneous judgment is not void unless the deciding court lacked subject matter jurisdiction or violated due process.  In the final divorce agreement between Robert Gross and Dawn Wilson, Gross agreed to regularly pay Wilson half of the value of his monthly ...
  • Fink v. Anchorage In Fink v. Anchorage, the Supreme Court of Alaska held that in directly reviewing a municipal assembly’s decision to levy a special assessment, a court will defer to the Assembly’s expertise and only reverse upon proof of fraud or arbitrariness.  Decades after an earthquake destroyed the neighborhood of Turnagain Heights, lot owners petitioned the Municipality ...
  • Miller v. Fowler In Miller v. Fowler, the Supreme Court of Alaska held that summary judgment will rarely be proper when the discovery rule is used to determine the accrual date of a statute of limitations as determining that date is a fact intensive analysis.  In September 2009, Miller purchased an apartment building from Fowler with a promissory ...
  • Toni 1 Trust, by Tangwall v. Wacker In Toni 1 Trust, by Tangwall v. Wacker, the supreme court held that section 34.40.110(k) of the Alaska Statutes cannot deprive either federal or other states’ courts of jurisdiction over fraudulent transfer actions. In 2007, a Montana court issued multiple default judgments against Tangwall and his family, leading them to transfer property to a trust ...
  • Mattox v. State In Mattox v. State,  Prior to the altercation, ...
  • State v. Seigle In State v. Seigle, Seigle was convicted ...
  • Reasner v. State In Reasner v. State, the supreme court held that the lower court erred in granting a motion for summary judgment on the grounds that the statute of limitations had tolled, because there was a material question of fact regarding when the alleged victim acquired the necessary information to alert her of a potential cause of ...
  • Johnson v. Johnson In Johnson v. Johnson,  At the conclusion of her divorce proceedings, Cynthia Johnson physically attacked her husband’s attorney as ...
  • Todeschi v. Sumitomo Metal Mining Pogo, LLC In Todeschi v. Sumitomo Metal Mining Pogo, LLC, the supreme court held the superior court’s refusal to provide an adverse inference jury instruction for an employee, based on the employer’s failure to produce certain evidence during discovery, was harmless because the employee was permitted to argue in closing arguments that the jury could make adverse ...