Constitutional Law

  • Graham v. Durr In Graham v. Durr, the Alaska Supreme Court held that a defendant may, in a civil proceeding, assert his right to self-incrimination while the defendant’s direct appeal of his sentence is pending.  In August 2013, Stacey Graham struck and killed two pedestrians while driving under the influence.  In May 2014, the victims’ families filed suit against ...
  • Huber v. State, Department of Corrections In Huber v. State, Department of Corrections, the supreme court held that, with the possible exception of very simple cases, a hearing officer in a prison disciplinary proceeding must include the basis for their decision in writing or through a recording in order to satisfy due process.  Huber was an inmate at the Goose Creek ...
  • Simmons v. State, Department of Corrections In Simmons v. State, Department of Corrections, the Supreme Court of Alaska held that though AS 11.56.760 has a retroactive requirement that persons convicted of certain crimes provide a DNA sample, it is not an ex post facto law under the Constitution of Alaska.  David Simmons was found guilty of four felonies in September of ...
  • Mallot v. Stand for Salmon In Mallott v. Stand for Salmon, the Alaska Supreme Court held that a ballot initiative effects an unconstitutional appropriation if it transfers state assets into private hand or if it infringes on the legislature’s ability to allocate resources among competing use.  In July 2017, Stand for Salmon submitted ballot initiative 17FSH2 to establish a permitting scheme ...
  • Walker v. State, Department of Corrections In Walker v. State Department of Corrections, the supreme court held (1) a prisoner has a due process right to call witnesses in a disciplinary hearing and (2) a prisoner does not waive this right by failing to raise it during the administrative appeals process. In October 2013, Walker, an inmate, began work developing an ...
  • Watson v. State In Watson v. State, She was tried as an ...
  • Wielechowski v. State In Wielechowski v. State, In 2016, the legislature appropriated money from the Fund for dividend distributions, but the governor vetoed about half of the appropriation and the legislature was unable ...
  • Studley v. Alaska Public Offices Commission In Studley v. Alaska Public Offices Commission, Studley ran as a candidate for a local office and was therefore subject to Alaska’s financial ...
  • Moore v. State # In Moore v. State, After a magistrate judge in Dillingham denied an application ...
  • Richards v. University of Alaska In Richards v. University of Alaska, Richards, a Ph.D. student at the University of Alaska Fairbanks (UAF), plagiarized a course paper and was required ...

Constitutional Law

  • Graham v. Durr In Graham v. Durr, the Alaska Supreme Court held that a defendant may, in a civil proceeding, assert his right to self-incrimination while the defendant’s direct appeal of his sentence is pending.  In August 2013, Stacey Graham struck and killed two pedestrians while driving under the influence.  In May 2014, the victims’ families filed suit against ...
  • Huber v. State, Department of Corrections In Huber v. State, Department of Corrections, the supreme court held that, with the possible exception of very simple cases, a hearing officer in a prison disciplinary proceeding must include the basis for their decision in writing or through a recording in order to satisfy due process.  Huber was an inmate at the Goose Creek ...
  • Simmons v. State, Department of Corrections In Simmons v. State, Department of Corrections, the Supreme Court of Alaska held that though AS 11.56.760 has a retroactive requirement that persons convicted of certain crimes provide a DNA sample, it is not an ex post facto law under the Constitution of Alaska.  David Simmons was found guilty of four felonies in September of ...
  • Mallot v. Stand for Salmon In Mallott v. Stand for Salmon, the Alaska Supreme Court held that a ballot initiative effects an unconstitutional appropriation if it transfers state assets into private hand or if it infringes on the legislature’s ability to allocate resources among competing use.  In July 2017, Stand for Salmon submitted ballot initiative 17FSH2 to establish a permitting scheme ...
  • Walker v. State, Department of Corrections In Walker v. State Department of Corrections, the supreme court held (1) a prisoner has a due process right to call witnesses in a disciplinary hearing and (2) a prisoner does not waive this right by failing to raise it during the administrative appeals process. In October 2013, Walker, an inmate, began work developing an ...
  • Watson v. State In Watson v. State, She was tried as an ...
  • Wielechowski v. State In Wielechowski v. State, In 2016, the legislature appropriated money from the Fund for dividend distributions, but the governor vetoed about half of the appropriation and the legislature was unable ...
  • Studley v. Alaska Public Offices Commission In Studley v. Alaska Public Offices Commission, Studley ran as a candidate for a local office and was therefore subject to Alaska’s financial ...
  • Moore v. State # In Moore v. State, After a magistrate judge in Dillingham denied an application ...
  • Richards v. University of Alaska In Richards v. University of Alaska, Richards, a Ph.D. student at the University of Alaska Fairbanks (UAF), plagiarized a course paper and was required ...