Election Law

Pruitt v. Office of Lieutenant Governor

Posted on May 6th, 2022

ELECTION LAW Margot Graham In Pruitt v. Office of Lieutenant Governor, 498 P.3d 591 (Alaska 2021), the supreme court held the losing House candidate failed to meet his burden to sustain an election contest claim (Id. at 608). Pruitt, a losing House candidate, sued the Division of Elections, claiming that it committed malconduct that influenced Continue Reading »

State, Office of Lieutenant Governor v. Vote Yes for Alaska’s Fair Share

Posted on January 1st, 2022

ELECTION LAW Maddie Ayer In State, Office of Lieutenant Governor v. Vote Yes for Alaska’s Fair Share, 478 P.3d 679 (Alaska 2021), the supreme court held that the lieutenant governor’s summary of a ballot initiative was not true and impartial as required by law, and granted in part the lieutenant governor’s request to insert a Continue Reading »

Alaska Public Offices Commission v. Not Tammie

Posted on January 1st, 2022

ELECTION LAW Clara Nieman In Alaska Public Offices Commission v. Not Tammie, 482 P.3d 386 (Alaska 2021), the supreme court held that (1) the governor must explicitly, not implicitly, assign Alaska Public Offices Commission (APOC) hearing officers, and (2) the governor-appointed hearing officer may be an agency employee or commissioner. (Id. at 388–89). During an Continue Reading »

Republican Governors Association v. Alaska Public Offices Commission

Posted on January 1st, 2022

ELECTION LAW Margot Graham In Republican Governors Association v. Alaska Public Offices Commission, 485 P.3d 545 (Alaska 2021), the supreme court held that the Republican Governors Association violated a campaign finance registration statute that required registration prior to making “expenditures.” (Id. at 553). In advance of the 2018 gubernatorial primary race and before registering with Continue Reading »

Dodge v. Meyer

Posted on April 14th, 2020

In Dodge v. Meyer,[1] the supreme court held it proper to not count an election ballot with filled-in ovals next to both candidates’ names and an ‘X’ over one of the filled-in ovals. The initial vote count of the 2018 race for the District 1 seat in the Alaska House of Representatives gave candidates Dodge Continue Reading »

Election Law

Pruitt v. Office of Lieutenant Governor

Posted on May 6th, 2022

ELECTION LAW Margot Graham In Pruitt v. Office of Lieutenant Governor, 498 P.3d 591 (Alaska 2021), the supreme court held the losing House candidate failed to meet his burden to sustain an election contest claim (Id. at 608). Pruitt, a losing House candidate, sued the Division of Elections, claiming that it committed malconduct that influenced Continue Reading »

State, Office of Lieutenant Governor v. Vote Yes for Alaska’s Fair Share

Posted on January 1st, 2022

ELECTION LAW Maddie Ayer In State, Office of Lieutenant Governor v. Vote Yes for Alaska’s Fair Share, 478 P.3d 679 (Alaska 2021), the supreme court held that the lieutenant governor’s summary of a ballot initiative was not true and impartial as required by law, and granted in part the lieutenant governor’s request to insert a Continue Reading »

Alaska Public Offices Commission v. Not Tammie

Posted on January 1st, 2022

ELECTION LAW Clara Nieman In Alaska Public Offices Commission v. Not Tammie, 482 P.3d 386 (Alaska 2021), the supreme court held that (1) the governor must explicitly, not implicitly, assign Alaska Public Offices Commission (APOC) hearing officers, and (2) the governor-appointed hearing officer may be an agency employee or commissioner. (Id. at 388–89). During an Continue Reading »

Republican Governors Association v. Alaska Public Offices Commission

Posted on January 1st, 2022

ELECTION LAW Margot Graham In Republican Governors Association v. Alaska Public Offices Commission, 485 P.3d 545 (Alaska 2021), the supreme court held that the Republican Governors Association violated a campaign finance registration statute that required registration prior to making “expenditures.” (Id. at 553). In advance of the 2018 gubernatorial primary race and before registering with Continue Reading »

Dodge v. Meyer

Posted on April 14th, 2020

In Dodge v. Meyer,[1] the supreme court held it proper to not count an election ballot with filled-in ovals next to both candidates’ names and an ‘X’ over one of the filled-in ovals. The initial vote count of the 2018 race for the District 1 seat in the Alaska House of Representatives gave candidates Dodge Continue Reading »