Employment Law

  • Moody v. Lodge In Moody v. Lodge, the Alaska Supreme Court held that whether time not spent actively performing duties should be counted towards overtime under the Alaska Wage and Hour Act (AWHA) is determined by applying the standard of Hutka v. Sisters of Providence in Washington.  From 2002 to 2007, Jeff Moody worked as a pilot for Royal ...
  • Atkins v. Intel Transportation & Taxi Service, Inc. In Atkins v. Intel Transportation & Taxi Service, Inc., the supreme court held a claimant who fails to obtain written approval from his employer or the Alaska Workers’ Compensation Benefits Guaranty Fund (“The Fund”) before settling a personal-injury claim against a third party, as required by Alaska Workers’ Compensation Act, cannot seek workers’ compensation.  In ...
  • Sleeper v. URS Midwest In Sleeper v. URS Midwest, the district court held that the Alaska Wage and Hour Act (AWHA) is not preempted by the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA).  Sleeper was employed by URS as a truck driver.  Sleeper claimed that during his employment, URS failed to pay him overtime and illegally deducted pay he earned.  As ...
  • Alaska State Commission for Human Rights v. Anderson In Alaska State Commission for Human Rights v. Anderson, the supreme court held that a statute mandating confidentiality in investigations permits an agency to exclude third-parties from investigative interviews.  An employee of Alaska’s Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) filed a discrimination complaint with the Commission for Human Rights, which enforces Alaska’s anti-discrimination laws.  ...
  • Kang v. Mullins In Kang v. Mullins the supreme court reversed the Alaska Workers’ Compensation Appeals Commission, deciding that a woman was not her neighbor’s employer when she hired him to complete repairs on a home she rented to use as a residence and place of business. Yong Kang rented a home in North Pole from her son. ...
  • Burke v. Raven Electric, Inc. In Burke v. Raven Electric, Inc. the court held that the exclusive remedy provision of the Workers’ Compensation Act (the Act) (1) does not violate the due process or equal protection clauses and (2) bars relief under the Defective Machinery Act. The mother of an employee killed at work sought workers’ compensation death benefits, arguing ...
  • State v. Shea In State v. Shea, Shea presented evidence that she suffered from chronic pain in the form of ilioinginal neuralgia ...
  • Alaska Airlines, Inc. v. Darrow In Alaska Airlines, Inc. v. Darrow, the statute that allowed reduction to PTD benefits did not authorize any offset for ...
  • Lingley v. Alaska Airlines, Inc. In Lingley v. Alaska Airlines, Inc. the supreme court held that the Railway Labor Act (“RLA”) does not expressly waive an employee’s right to litigate therefore not requiring employees under its collective bargaining agreement to first exhaust contractual remedies. Plaintiff was an employee for defendant who was terminated for allegedly stealing a left-behind pair ...
  • Bernard v. Alaska Airlines, Inc. In Bernard v. Alaska Airlines, Inc., the supreme court held that an employee may file suit against their employer to enforce rights that do not depend on the terms of a collective bargaining agreement, and that an employee need not exhaust all contractual remedies before bringing suit unless they have clearly and unmistakably waived ...

Employment Law

  • Moody v. Lodge In Moody v. Lodge, the Alaska Supreme Court held that whether time not spent actively performing duties should be counted towards overtime under the Alaska Wage and Hour Act (AWHA) is determined by applying the standard of Hutka v. Sisters of Providence in Washington.  From 2002 to 2007, Jeff Moody worked as a pilot for Royal ...
  • Atkins v. Intel Transportation & Taxi Service, Inc. In Atkins v. Intel Transportation & Taxi Service, Inc., the supreme court held a claimant who fails to obtain written approval from his employer or the Alaska Workers’ Compensation Benefits Guaranty Fund (“The Fund”) before settling a personal-injury claim against a third party, as required by Alaska Workers’ Compensation Act, cannot seek workers’ compensation.  In ...
  • Sleeper v. URS Midwest In Sleeper v. URS Midwest, the district court held that the Alaska Wage and Hour Act (AWHA) is not preempted by the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA).  Sleeper was employed by URS as a truck driver.  Sleeper claimed that during his employment, URS failed to pay him overtime and illegally deducted pay he earned.  As ...
  • Alaska State Commission for Human Rights v. Anderson In Alaska State Commission for Human Rights v. Anderson, the supreme court held that a statute mandating confidentiality in investigations permits an agency to exclude third-parties from investigative interviews.  An employee of Alaska’s Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) filed a discrimination complaint with the Commission for Human Rights, which enforces Alaska’s anti-discrimination laws.  ...
  • Kang v. Mullins In Kang v. Mullins the supreme court reversed the Alaska Workers’ Compensation Appeals Commission, deciding that a woman was not her neighbor’s employer when she hired him to complete repairs on a home she rented to use as a residence and place of business. Yong Kang rented a home in North Pole from her son. ...
  • Burke v. Raven Electric, Inc. In Burke v. Raven Electric, Inc. the court held that the exclusive remedy provision of the Workers’ Compensation Act (the Act) (1) does not violate the due process or equal protection clauses and (2) bars relief under the Defective Machinery Act. The mother of an employee killed at work sought workers’ compensation death benefits, arguing ...
  • State v. Shea In State v. Shea, Shea presented evidence that she suffered from chronic pain in the form of ilioinginal neuralgia ...
  • Alaska Airlines, Inc. v. Darrow In Alaska Airlines, Inc. v. Darrow, the statute that allowed reduction to PTD benefits did not authorize any offset for ...
  • Lingley v. Alaska Airlines, Inc. In Lingley v. Alaska Airlines, Inc. the supreme court held that the Railway Labor Act (“RLA”) does not expressly waive an employee’s right to litigate therefore not requiring employees under its collective bargaining agreement to first exhaust contractual remedies. Plaintiff was an employee for defendant who was terminated for allegedly stealing a left-behind pair ...
  • Bernard v. Alaska Airlines, Inc. In Bernard v. Alaska Airlines, Inc., the supreme court held that an employee may file suit against their employer to enforce rights that do not depend on the terms of a collective bargaining agreement, and that an employee need not exhaust all contractual remedies before bringing suit unless they have clearly and unmistakably waived ...