Family Law

  • Solomon v. Solomon In Solomon v. Solomon, the Supreme Court of Alaska held that a trial court must make sufficient factual findings to allow review of its legal conclusion an individual has a history of domestic violence. Terrace and Wendy Solomon married in 1999 and had four children; the two separated in 2014, and in January 2015 Wendy ...
  • Kailyn S. v. Alaska Department of Health and Social Services In Kailyn S. v Alaska Department of Health and Social Services, the supreme court held that it is not an abuse of discretion to deny a motion for a continuance in a termination of parental rights hearing when the motion is only supported by a speculative assertion that it is necessary.  Kailyn, a mother, filed for ...
  • Maxwell v. Sosnowski In Maxwell v. Sosnowski, the supreme court held that a court may only award credit for post-separation mortgage payments for those payments made after the date of separation. Jill Maxwell and William Sosnowski permanently separated on May 31, 2013, and were later divorced. During their marriage, they had purchased a triplex in Anchorage together. Sosnowski ...
  • Dean S. v. State, Department of Health & Social Services In Dean S. v. State, Department of Health & Social Services, the supreme court held that a superior court’s procedurally proper denial of a motion to withdraw consent to adoption will not be overturned absent clear error established by a “definite impression” of factual error in the record. Dean and Emily S. were investigated by ...
  • Wyman v. Whitson In Wyman v. Whitson, the supreme court held that because fishing permits and quota shares are perpetual intangible assets with an indefinite useful life, an amortization of those assets is not deductible from income for child support purposes. Wyman, a self-employed commercial fisherman, owned several fishing permits and individual fishing quota shares as part of ...
  • Osborne v. State In Wiegers v. Richards-Wiegers, the supreme court reviewed the lower court’s division of a marital estate and held that a court can rely on an expert witness’s valuation method when recognized as valid and adequately supported by the expert’s testimony. Additionally, the court held that retirement health benefits vested before marriage can be marital assets if ...
  • Holmes v. Holmes In Holmes v. Holmes, the supreme court held that a two-week change in custody time by a parent, and a change in a parent’s salary and employment status, constitute material changes which justify a court’s decision to modify a child support order. Branlund Holmes and Tamara Holmes shared custody of their two minor children. The ...
  • Farr v. Little In Farr v. Little, the Supreme Court held that when a superior court uses its discretion to impute income to a parent for child support purposes, it must set forth its factual findings and explanation for the imputed income. Little was awarded custody of her and Farr’s children and filed a motion for child support. ...
  • Diego K. v. State Department of Health & Social Services In Diego K. v. State Department of Health & Social Services, the supreme court held that, when a court is making factual findings and legal conclusions in a child in need of aid (CINA) hearing, it is error to rely upon substantial information not in evidence. Between March 2014 and April 2016, a series of ...
  • Kessler v. Kessler In Kessler v. Kessler, the supreme court held the mere use of separate property for marital purposes, without a donative intent, does not transform separate property into marital property. In 2010, Kenneth Kessler and Dianna Kessler were married; Dianna filed for divorce in 2015. Prior to their marriage, in 1999, Kenneth bought a condominium. The ...

Family Law

  • Solomon v. Solomon In Solomon v. Solomon, the Supreme Court of Alaska held that a trial court must make sufficient factual findings to allow review of its legal conclusion an individual has a history of domestic violence. Terrace and Wendy Solomon married in 1999 and had four children; the two separated in 2014, and in January 2015 Wendy ...
  • Kailyn S. v. Alaska Department of Health and Social Services In Kailyn S. v Alaska Department of Health and Social Services, the supreme court held that it is not an abuse of discretion to deny a motion for a continuance in a termination of parental rights hearing when the motion is only supported by a speculative assertion that it is necessary.  Kailyn, a mother, filed for ...
  • Maxwell v. Sosnowski In Maxwell v. Sosnowski, the supreme court held that a court may only award credit for post-separation mortgage payments for those payments made after the date of separation. Jill Maxwell and William Sosnowski permanently separated on May 31, 2013, and were later divorced. During their marriage, they had purchased a triplex in Anchorage together. Sosnowski ...
  • Dean S. v. State, Department of Health & Social Services In Dean S. v. State, Department of Health & Social Services, the supreme court held that a superior court’s procedurally proper denial of a motion to withdraw consent to adoption will not be overturned absent clear error established by a “definite impression” of factual error in the record. Dean and Emily S. were investigated by ...
  • Wyman v. Whitson In Wyman v. Whitson, the supreme court held that because fishing permits and quota shares are perpetual intangible assets with an indefinite useful life, an amortization of those assets is not deductible from income for child support purposes. Wyman, a self-employed commercial fisherman, owned several fishing permits and individual fishing quota shares as part of ...
  • Osborne v. State In Wiegers v. Richards-Wiegers, the supreme court reviewed the lower court’s division of a marital estate and held that a court can rely on an expert witness’s valuation method when recognized as valid and adequately supported by the expert’s testimony. Additionally, the court held that retirement health benefits vested before marriage can be marital assets if ...
  • Holmes v. Holmes In Holmes v. Holmes, the supreme court held that a two-week change in custody time by a parent, and a change in a parent’s salary and employment status, constitute material changes which justify a court’s decision to modify a child support order. Branlund Holmes and Tamara Holmes shared custody of their two minor children. The ...
  • Farr v. Little In Farr v. Little, the Supreme Court held that when a superior court uses its discretion to impute income to a parent for child support purposes, it must set forth its factual findings and explanation for the imputed income. Little was awarded custody of her and Farr’s children and filed a motion for child support. ...
  • Diego K. v. State Department of Health & Social Services In Diego K. v. State Department of Health & Social Services, the supreme court held that, when a court is making factual findings and legal conclusions in a child in need of aid (CINA) hearing, it is error to rely upon substantial information not in evidence. Between March 2014 and April 2016, a series of ...
  • Kessler v. Kessler In Kessler v. Kessler, the supreme court held the mere use of separate property for marital purposes, without a donative intent, does not transform separate property into marital property. In 2010, Kenneth Kessler and Dianna Kessler were married; Dianna filed for divorce in 2015. Prior to their marriage, in 1999, Kenneth bought a condominium. The ...